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Honduran Armed Forces Provide Medical Care to 60,000 Civilians

first_imgBy Dialogo March 09, 2015 It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. Bringing health care to the civilian population Bringing health care to the civilian population The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Comprehensive assistance “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Helping the civilian population As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. Helping the civilian population Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. Comprehensive assistance The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” last_img read more

Pirates Boys Soccer – End Of Season Awards Night

first_imgThe Greensburg Pirates held their team banquet Thursday evening and the following awards were presented.Team voted awards:Pirate Award: Logan Yeager.“Team Above Self” Award: Kirk Scott.Most Improved: Trevin White.Most Valuable Player: Drew Reiger.All EIAC: Drew Reiger.2015 Letter winners: Kirk Scott, Jake Buening, Kyle Bumbala, Nicholas Zapfe, David Santiago, Brady Niles, Francis Teague, José Rosales, Camden Rose, Joseph Pacilio, Jordan Kramer, Trevor Lee, Trevin White, Aaron Sia, Logan Yeager, Drew Reiger, Andrew Schroeder.Courtesy of Pirates Coach Cody DeVolld.last_img

Copa America Preview: Group A

first_imgNinety-nine years ago the birth of the Copa America, the sport’s oldest continental competition, brought about a rapid change to the game of football.Held almost annually in the early years, the tournament fostered a dramatic rise in the standards of South American sides – made evident when Uruguay arrived unheralded at the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris and walked off with the gold medal. They enchanted observers with the beauty of their play and led to a question being asked: how can we find out which really is the best team around, given that professionals cannot enter the Olympics?The answer, of course, was the creation of the World Cup – first staged, and won, by Uruguay, just 14 years after they had claimed the inaugural Copa.Since then, the Copa has been through a number of phases, at times playing host to the best football in the world, at others neglected. It was brought back in 1987, and taken round all of South America’s10 footballing nations, but it found itself overshadowed by another significant development in South American football – the introduction, in 1996, of the marathon format of World Cup qualification, where all 10 nations play each other home and away, a change which has done wonders for the standard of the less traditional nations.For a few years the Copa seemed superfluous, and between 1997 and 2004 four versions were played, all with plenty of understrength teams. Since then, though, the Copa has found its place in the calendar.The 2015 edition begins today. [See Group B and Group C] –ChileCopa America titles: 0Last Copa title: NeverCoach: Jorge Sampaoli Finish in the most recent Copa: QuarterfinalsPlayer to watch: Alexis Sanchez is coming off his best professional season, scoring 25 goals and recording 12 assists in all competitions for Arsenal in 2014-15. His offense will be vital if Chile are to lift their first Copa America title.Greatest player: Elias Figueroa — Figueroa was an elegant central defender whom Brazil legend Pele called “probably the finest central defender in the history of football in the Americas.”Greatest achievement: Hosts of the 1962 World Cup, Chile finished third, missing the final at the hands of a rampant Garrincha-led Brazil in the semis. –MexicoNumber of Copa America titles: 0Last Copa title: NeverCoach: Miguel HerreraFinish in the most recent Copa: Group stage Player to watch: Jesus ‘Tecatito’ Corona has been one of few bright spots in Mexico’s lead-up to Copa America, often playing on a different level than his Chile-bound El Tri teammates.Greatest player: Hugo Sanchez — Top scorer on five different occasions in La Liga and once in Mexico, the acrobatic ‘Hugol’ is unquestionably Mexico’s greatest ever football export.Greatest achievement: Mexico’s 1999 Confederations Cup victory was the country’s first major inter-federational trophy. El Tri’s gold medal over Neymar’s Brazil at Wembley in 2012 was one to cherish as well — albeit at ‘amateur’ level.– EcuadorCoach: Gustavo QuinterosNumber of Copa America titles: 0Last title: NeverFinish in the most recent Copa: Group stagePlayer to watch: Miller Bolanos — A star for Guayaquil giants Emelec, the quick striker will look to open the eyes of an international audience in Chile. Greatest player: Alberto Spencer — Spencer, known as ‘The Magic Head,’ was a prolific forward for legendary Uruguayan club Penarol who carved his name in South American history as the Copa Libertadores’ all-time top goal scorer.Greatest achievement: The 2006 World Cup quarterfinals. La Tri earned qualification to a World Cup knockout stage for the first time in 2006, advancing with hosts Germany out of Group A.–BoliviaNumber of Copa America titles: 1Last Copa title: 1963Coach: Mauricio SoriaFinish in the most recent Copa: Group stagePlayer to watch: Marcelo Moreno — Big, physical and acrobatic in the air, Moreno will be Bolivia’s main reference up front in Chile.Greatest player: Marco Etcheverry — A skillful and clever playmaker, El Diablo scored 13 goals in 71 appearances for El Verde between 1989 and 2003, while guiding Bolivia to the World Cup finals in 1994.Greatest achievement: The 1963 South American title. Taking advantage of the country’s extreme altitudes, Bolivia lifted its only South American championship title on home soil in 1963. See also: Group B preview and Group C preview–last_img read more