Tag : 爱上海AC

85-year-old fan’s streak of Packers playoff games will go on

first_imgGREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — An 85-year-old Green Bay Packers fan who has never missed a playoff game at Lambeau Field thought her streak was coming to an end this week until two charitable brothers heard her story. Fritzie Neitzel went to her first Packers game with her father in October 1945, when she was 10. As longtime season ticket holders, her family unsuccessfully tried buying seats for the NFC championship game once they went on sale. That’s when the Spirit of Wisconsin Booster Club, a charity led by Steve and Neal Ewing, heard Neitzel’s story and gifted her tickets to the game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Because of COVID-19 restrictions, the Packers said all tickets on cellphones are nontransferable. So Steve Ewing drove from Milwaukee to Green Bay to hand off the phone with the tickets.last_img read more

Honduran Armed Forces Provide Medical Care to 60,000 Civilians

first_imgBy Dialogo March 09, 2015 It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. Bringing health care to the civilian population Bringing health care to the civilian population The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Comprehensive assistance “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Helping the civilian population As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. Helping the civilian population Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. Comprehensive assistance The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” last_img read more

Manuel Pellegrini: Manchester City are not over-reliant on Sergio Aguero

first_img City twice had to come from behind with goals from their Argentinian striker to salvage a 2-2 draw at West Ham on Saturday evening. Aguero won and converted a penalty to cancel out Enner Valencia’s first-minute opener, and dragged his side level again 10 minutes from full-time after Valencia’s second. “But Joe didn’t have to work too much in the second half. We didn’t have important problems in defence – just the concentration for the second goal.” Aguero swept City level with 10 minutes left after a powerful run from substitute Kelechi Iheanacho. Yet West Ham could still have snatched victory had Kouyate’s stoppage-time header from Mark Noble’s free-kick not clipped the crossbar. “I’m really proud of the team, and a little disappointed we didn’t win,” said Hammers manager Slaven Bilic. “We could have got the third goal even though they were dominating. So when I went back into dressing room I felt disappointed. But that’s good. That shows how well we played. “We were fantastic as a team and as individuals. The individuals were the cherry on top of the pie, and the pie was the team performance.” But City boss Pellegrini insisted: “I don’t think our team is just Sergio Aguero. We are fighting for the title and involved in other competitions with a lot of injuries, so it’s important to have him 100 per cent fit. “But we have a squad which is the reason why we are fighting for the title.” City’s now notoriously shaky defence failed its first test at Upton Park after just 55 seconds. Cheikhou Kouyate strode past a non-existent challenge from Yaya Toure and into the area before cutting the ball back for the unmarked Valencia to slam under Joe Hart. Agureo, who also hit the post, hauled the visitors level after he had been tripped in the area by Carl Jenkinson, coolly sending Adrian the wrong way from the penalty spot. City were inches from taking the lead in the 55th minute when Fabian Delph’s low shot hit the foot of Adrian’s post – but moments later West Ham went back in front. Michail Antonio’s quickly-taken throw-in, of all things, caught the City defence napping and Valencia brushed off Nicolas Otamendi’s feeble challenge before prodding the ball past Hart. “Perhaps we were not concentrating,” admitted Pellegrini. “When there is a throw-in maybe you are not thinking there is danger, but we know Antonio has a long throw. Manuel Pellegrini maintains Manchester City are not a one-man team despite Sergio Aguero’s latest rescue act. Press Associationlast_img read more

Breast cancer survivor Anna Smith soldiers on

first_imgWith October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Caribbean National Weekly sat down with breast cancer survivor, Jamaican Anna Smith, to discuss her journey with the disease. She spoke candidly about her decisions, and how she feels now that it is all behind her. Tanya N. RagbeerAt 50 years old, cancer survivor Anna Smith discovered that something was wrong during a breast examination self-test. She found a lump in one of her breasts and was quick to act. “Well, I’d better go to the doctor and find out what it is,” she thought.This was March, 2015. However, it wasn’t until May of that year that she was officially diagnosed.“I went to the doctor and got all my tests done, got my mammogram done. The office that I went to, Pembroke Pink, has a doctor on staff and actually tells you immediately (whether or not there is anything positive),” said Smith.The staff are also quick to respond, so when I did the mammogram, the lady looked at me and said, ‘let me get the doctor’.”Positive diagnosis  When the doctor arrived, he was also forthcoming. “It looks positive,” he told her and immediately recommended additional testing. Smith was sent for a biopsy and ultrasound, which produced positive results though it did not appear to have spread to her other breast, or organs.Anna’s family (husband Patrick, daughter Rachel, and son Ryan) are very supportive of her fight against cancer.Smith, a practical person, told her husband. “It’s positive, I have to make an appointment with a surgical oncologist so I’ll do that today, but right now, I’m going to work.”Several biopsiesThe surgical oncologist scheduled several biopsies: a standard biopsy, an MRI biopsy, and one where “they do the biopsy while you are sitting on a chair, you can actually see your results on a screen in front of you,” she said.  Each came back positive.Following conclusive results on the breast, the doctor recommended checking the other, “just to make sure.” So, Smith was sent back to do additional biopsies on the other breast.“I have always had fibrocystic breasts,” Smith proclaimed.However, the results were negative. Despite the fact, the doctor felt there was a high percentage that something could develop in the cancer-free breast.“We would have to make a decision,” Smith was told “either we wait and see if anything develops in the other one, or you take care of them both at the same time.”No hesitationWithout hesitation, Smith told her doctor, “There is no decision to make. Whatever has to be done, let’s go ahead and do it.”Double mastectomyShe endured a double mastectomy.  “The way I look at it is, that you can’t be afraid. Yes, you’re nervous and you don’t know what stage you’re at, you don’t know how far it’s gone… when you first find out, you don’t know all of these things,”  said the cancer survivor.When the doctor read her the results, she immediately told him, “I don’t want to take out the lump, I just want to take it off.” And when he asked her about the other one, she responded, “I’ll just take that off too.”Not wanting to be consumed by the experience, Smith continued working “like nothing happened” until she received the final results.“If I was to sit at home and focus on it or discuss it a lot before I found out how bad it was, I think I would have been more frightened, but I think that because I kept myself busy, I didn’t focus too much on it.Reconstruction Anna Smith went through six surgeries.  “It would have been probably four, but I had a mishap with one of them so I had to take it out and start all over again,” she explained.The surgeries took a toll on her body.“When you think of the breast, you don’t realize how many muscles are there that you use every day to get up, down, move around. It is very difficult.”Smith faced two options:Take fat from the stomach to build the breasts, which takes an estimated 7-12 hours with one or two surgeries. The results are “more natural” though the healing is longer (six to eight weeks) each.Implants (Anna’s choice); four to six surgeries, each with a recovery time of three weeks. This one feels “less natural,” according to Smith.“I feel fine. When I look at them, they don’t look real to me, but they don’t look bad. Sometimes they are a little uncomfortable. Every day gets a little easier.”“Honestly, if I had to do it again,” added cancer survivor Smith, “I don’t think I would put them on. I would just go without.”last_img read more