Tag : 乐上海

Humor Artists maintain success

first_imgThe Notre Dame Humor Artists see funny business as no laughing matter. Senior co-presidents Alec Vanthournout and Stephen Elser are gearing up for an upcoming show at Legends on Oct. 3 and one in Washington Hall on Oct. 11, and Elser said their experience alleviates their stage fright. “Our flexibility of improv helps,” Elser said. “We can do so many shows because it’s a lot of fun for us and it seems like the audience enjoys it.” Elser said he and Vanthournout are working on recruiting more members for the 30-person group. “There is a six-week training program. Each week, Meghan Brown, rectress of Lyons [Hall], runs a focus program on some particular aspect of humor,” Elser said. “[The students auditioning] then will present a show and people are invited back.” Vanthournout said the group doesn’t have much time to prepare for most of its shows. “Legends shows are known in advance, but we do a lot of shows on short notice,” he said. Vanthournout said the group performs four times per semester at Legends, which are the biggest in terms of campus audience.  They also do shows in dorms, before football games, in the library, in front of the Fisher Roof Sit and with Hannah and Friends, an organization that works to improve the quality of life for children and adults with special needs, he said. For two years now, Vanthournout said, 480 seats out of 500 in Washington Hall were filled for their shows there. “We like to check out the venue, attendance and how many games we can play, and then see how many people can be in the games based on the chemistry in the group,” Elser said. At one of the group’s Washington Hall shows, Elser said the Humor Artists performed with the a cappella group Halftime. “The crowd has an immense energy.  Being there and having a show that goes as well as it does is exciting,” he said. “We wrote a script and learned lines. Having everything come together and the audience loving it feels really rewarding.” Elser said his responsibilities as co-president include meetings with the Student Activities Office and other officers, on top of eight hours of straight improv per week, but the role isn’t necessarily work for him.   “It’s a great time to relax and just laugh,” he said. Vanthournout said he enjoys the group’s practices. “I never think, ‘Oh dang! I have to go to improv practice,’” he said. “It’s a lot of fun and I look forward to it every week.” The Humor Artists earned the distinction Club of the Year last year because of its hard work, but Elser said the group only received a certificate for the honor. “We didn’t even get the concession stand [Humor Artists] was promised,” Vanthournout said. Elser said the group is still proud of the award. “We remind our audiences of it constantly,” he said. Vanthournout said the group is branching out beyond live improv by making digital shorts on YouTube under the account “HumorArtistsofND.”  Elser said the group also manages a Facebook page and a Twitter account under the handle @HA_ND. Even though students can watch Humor Artists’ skits online, Elser said he still recommends they attend the group’s shows. “If you like laughter, and general merriment, come to Humor Artists’ shows, because that’s what we provide,” he said. “I’ve never talked to anyone who said that they hated the show,” he said. “How could they?  We’re the Club of the Year.”last_img read more

Speaker explores Catholic stance on climate change

first_imgCarolyn Woo, president and CEO of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), spoke of the need for responsibility and action in regards to climate change during her keynote address at the Notre Dame Climate Investing Conference on Wednesday. The conference, which began on Tuesday, focused on carbon energy reduction and opportunities for investing in environmentally-friendly technology.Woo’s lecture was largely concentrated on Pope Francis’ recent encyclical and how businesses have to react in order to align with the Vatican’s stance on climate change. She said people should feel the need to view and care for the Earth as “our common home.”“We are expected to praise God with our own life. To return thanks and return blessings. To acknowledge what we have received from this garden,” Woo said.Woo said the goal of her work at CRS, a non-profit organization, has been to provide for the poor and suffering throughout the world. As a result, Woo said she has seen the effect climate change has on the poor.Woo pointed in particular to the effects of one poor rainfall season in Ethiopia, which threatened the nation’s food supply. An estimated 40 million people will face food insecurity because of this drought, she said.The poor of the world, those who are most dependent on living off the land, will be most affected by climate change, Woo said. For this reason, she said she believes the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor to be “the same phenomenon.”Woo also discussed the role of business in the struggle against climate change. She contested the idea that the pope is against business, instead arguing that he is opposed only to the abuses and exploitation by businesses.“The pope is against idolatry, which is putting profits ahead of people,” Woo said.Woo said she has seen first-hand the effect of this idolatry during her time at CRS, recalling a trip to an Ethiopian flower farm that serviced big box stores in places like the United States.On this farm, the terrible working conditions and the lack of regulations on the air concentration caused workers to develop cancer at an extremely high rate, according to Woo. These types of “unethical predatory practices” by businesses sacrifice the health of the workers for the sake of profits, she said.However, Woo said business and greater environmental consciousness are not mutually exclusive. Business can still be “a noble vocation” if companies can make a conscious effort to create positive environmental change, she said.Woo pointed out the falsity of the common belief that energy use and economic growth are correlated by considering Germany’s recent economic growth without a similar increase in energy consumption. Woo said she believes this will provide an example to businesses, proving that companies can be both climate smart and business smart.Woo said the fight for climate change activists will not always be easy and help may not come from the government or other expected sources.“We don’t have permission to give up,” she said. “We just have to try different ways.”Woo closed by asking people to stop writing off climate change as a problem they can do nothing about.“There is a problem, and it is my problem,” Woo said. “And yes, there is something I can do about it.”Tags: Carolyn Woo, catholic relief services, Climate change, climate investing conference, CRSlast_img read more

“Club Cook” for sale

first_img53a Cook Street, North WardSTEPPING through the front door of 53a Cook Street is like being transported to a tropical resort.Behind the glass and timber front door lies one of two living areas while the gourmet kitchen complete with giant island bench and high-end appliances takes pride of place.Beyond the indoor and outdoor areas blend seamlessly.From the outdoor patio the sounds of trickling water can be heard provided by a stunning water feature that flows through to the pool framed by tropical gardens reminiscent of a Balinese villa. 53a Cook Street, North Ward“I can’t think of a single thing you would change in this property,” she said. “It has everything and the feedback has been that as well.“People have been extremely impressed with the quality of the build and the design.“North Ward is also the suburb of choice for professionals but also downsizers because they want to be able to walk to The Strand.” 53a Cook Street, North Ward 53a Cook Street, North WardMrs McClure said they had made the decision to downsize but they would be remaining in North Ward.The home is located only a short walk from The Strand, shops and restaurants.It is filled with luxury appointments such as a double oven in the kitchen and Caesarstone benchtops, walk-in wardrobe, water feature, two indoor living areas and a double remote-controlled garage with direct entry to the home.Living Here Townsville agent Margaret Hill said the contemporary home had been expertly built and designed.center_img 53a Cook Street, North WardNeutral tones inside add to the relaxed vibe and laidback style of the home.A void created by the timber staircase creates an architectural feature in the heart of the house while the top floor has more bedrooms, a second living area, and two balconies with pleasant views of Castle Hill.The four-bedroom, three- bathroom, two-storey house nestled in the seaside suburb of North Ward is now on the market and asking for offers of more than $935,000. 53a Cook Street, North WardMore from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Deni McClure designed the home while it was constructed by her builder husband Chris McClure.Mrs McClure said they had nicknamed this luxurious abode “Club Cook” because every day living there feels like a holiday in an exotic, tropical location. “We wanted it to be open so you can be inside but you feel like you’re outside and then you’ve also got lots of outdoor areas,” she said.“When our family come they call it ‘Club Cook’. Then, when we have Christmas off but we’re not actually going anywhere, and people ask where we’re going for Christmas we say ‘Club Cook’. And they go ‘where’s that?’– and we say ‘it’s 53a Cook Street’.“It’s like we’ve gone to Bali.”last_img read more