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Lin-Manuel Miranda & More Enlisted for Hillary Clinton Fundraiser

first_imgLin-Manuel Miranda Broadway is joining forces in support of Hillary Clinton. Tony winners Lin-Manuel Miranda, Hugh Jackman, Neil Patrick Harris, Cynthia Erivo, Helen Mirren, Matthew Broderick, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Bernadette Peters and more have boarded a fundraiser concert on October 17 at the St. James Theatre. Stephen Schwartz, Harvey Weinstein, Jordan Roth and Richie Jackson are producing.Hosted by Billy Crystal, the event will also include performances and appearances by Anne Hathaway, Angela Bassett, Julia Roberts, Sarah Jessica Parker, Emily Blunt, Sienna Miller, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Andrea McArdle, Ayodele Casel and the Broadway-bound Josh Groban.Directed by Tony winner Michael Mayer, with musical direction by Seth Rudetsky, Tony winner John Guare is taking charge of the script and Tony winner Diane Paulus will act as a special consultant. Chelsea clinton will be in attendance.Check out a new #Ham4Vote video below. View Commentslast_img read more

Queen of the Trail

first_imgThe Overall RecordA close friend once told me, “If you don’t fail at something at least once, then you haven’t set your goals high enough.” I realized that failure was a huge possibility in returning to the A.T. for the overall record. And I didn’t care.I hated the idea of not trying far more than the thought of not succeeding. I had finished my last A.T. hike with gas left in the tank, and no matter where my hike ended in 2011, I promised myself that I would leave the trail empty, unable to take another step. I wanted to know what it felt like to give 100 percent.One day on a record attempt feels like an eternity. I told myself that the first two weeks of the trip would be the most painful fourteen days of my life. I was right.The first four days of the trip were extremely difficult. My body was trying to cope with all the dull aches and sharp pains that come at the beginning. The bottom of my feet stung with each step, but I expected this. I knew that if I could work through it, I would then develop the desired numbness below my ankles that would last for the rest of the hike.Despite the initial pain, I loved being back on the A.T. The path felt familiar, and each day I looked forward to the upcoming terrain. On the morning of the fourth day, I was able to do something that I had always wanted to do. I forded the Kennebec. The wide river has a canoe ferry to help hikers across the fast-moving torrents – and for good reason. But with the help of my good friend and 16-time A.T. veteran, Warren Doyle, I crossed the river on foot. The water was chest high and even though the endeavor demanded a high level of exertion, I experienced a burst of energy upon reaching the opposite shore. I was experiencing the trail in a new way and I loved it—until day five.That’s when I developed shin splints. I had never experienced shin splints before, and the pain was so intense that I was convinced I had stress fractures in both legs. Every step hurt. At times my legs would buckle beneath me, unable to support my weight. My hiking poles became crutches, and there were several times when I hiked down the trail sobbing and yelping because of the unbearable sensation in my lower legs. I knew that former record holders had worked through shin splints, and I decided that I would try to do the same, at least until I was forced to crawl.My shin splints stayed with me throughout the White Mountains, where I had two straight days of sleet and rain. I fell countless times on the slick rocks, and at one point I looked at my leg and discovered there was more blue and purple than tan. When I finally reached Vermont hoping that softer terrain would heal my legs, I contracted a violent illness that forced me off-trail and into the bushes every half-mile. My body had not adapted to the challenge. I thought I was done.I told Brew at the base of Mount Killington that I wanted to quit. Then Brew, my sympathetic, caring, reasonable husband who believed in a life lived with balance and hikes that included naps and meditation, told me that I had to keep going.I couldn’t believe my ears. I had expected Brew to coddle and comfort me, not to tell me to keep hiking. It was so contrary to his personality and demeanor that it made me realize how much he believed in me. Brew knew how much this opportunity meant to me, and even though we were 1,700 miles away from Springer Mountain, and I was suffering from shin-splints and diarrhea, he still believed that we could set the record.I left the road and slowly, painfully made my way toward the top of Mount Killington. Once I reached the other side of the mountain, there was no looking back. Brew’s belief had rekindled my desire to set the record. The trail had taken away any sense of pride or false notion that I could do this on my own. I knew that I could not be successful without Brew, and we would only achieve our goal with the help of others.South of Vermont, the terrain and weather became more agreeable and my shin splints finally started to subside. It took over 1,000 miles for the pain to fully go away.Going the DistanceOur daily routine consisted of waking up at 4:45 a.m. I would try to start hiking at 5 a.m. and then I would continue hiking for the next 16 to 17 hours. My intermittent breaks came at the road crossings where I met Brew. However, it was not a time to relax. Instead, it was my job to ingest as many calories as possible, bandage any problem blisters, ice my shins, and then get back on the trail as soon as possible. I would continue hiking until 9 or 10 o’clock at night, when I came to a good camping site or road crossing. There I would quickly try to eat dinner, wipe down my limbs with Wet Ones, and then crawl into my sleeping bag for 6 hours of sleep.From the very beginning the numbers were overwhelming. Talk of miles per hour and daily averages psyched me out. We occasionally talked about where former record holder Andrew Thompson would be relative to our location, but that didn’t motivate me either. Andrew is a great person and amazing athlete, worthy of a trail record. Even when I tried to vilify him in my mind, it still didn’t inspire me. The trail record wasn’t about numbers or about beating Andrew Thompson; it was about doing my best. That became our mantra.Whenever I left the car at a road crossing, Brew would yell after me, “Just do your best.”Brew and I worked together as one unit, and I have never in my life trusted someone so completely. We also benefited from the invaluable support of numerous friends who assisted us along the trail: some provided food, others helped with logistics, and some, my personal favorites, hiked with me and carried my pack. It’s called muling, and I love it.The closer we got to North Carolina, the more support we received. Because I wasn’t running at all, a wide variety of people were able to hike with me on the trail. I hiked with both of my brothers, two retirees, several previous thru-hikers, and a handful of trail runners. I even had the opportunity to hike with two of my trail heroes, Anne Lundblad and Matt Kirk. The fact that individuals who I believed to be superhuman were coming to the trail to hike with me was both humbling and encouraging.Toward the end of the hike it felt as if I were straining for a goal that was much larger and more involved than I had ever imagined. I wasn’t just hiking for myself anymore. I was hiking for a community that believed in defying the odds, striving for your fullest potential, and helping one another. I was hiking to promote a path that has the power to positively change and impact lives. I was still hiking for Meredith. And I was hiking because it had become a symbol of my husband’s sacrificial love for me.Reaching the top of Springer Mountain, hand in hand with Brew, was one of the most amazing moments in my entire life.I had set the overall A.T. speed record in 46 days, 11 hours, 20 minutes. Even at the finish, the record still was not about the numbers. It was about the memories and friendships we built along the way. We had given everything we had to the trail, and it had given us even more in return.Walking back down the mountain, I stumbled down the dirt tread, tripping on roots, stubbing my toes on rocks, and struggling to put one foot in front of the other. I was so tired that the path blurred in front of me.I smiled and thought to myself: “So this is what 100 percent feels like.” Jennifer and Brew. When I graduated college, I wanted an adventure. I had spent my entire life doing what was expected of me and trying to please other people. Now I needed time to define my own expectations.I decided that the 2,181-mile Appalachian Trail would be a perfect post-college activity, and hoped it would give me enough time to figure out what it was I wanted to do with my life.The experience was far more difficult than I had ever imagined it would be. Beyond the physical hardships of hiking each day, I had to endure several unique challenges that most thru-hikers never encounter: I was struck by lightning, my eye froze shut in a snowstorm, I was followed by a hiker that I wanted nothing to do with, I suffered the early stages of trench foot, and I was deeply affected mid-hike when I encountered a death on the trail. When I finally reached Mount Katahdin in Maine and touched the worn brown sign that marked the end of the trail, I swore to myself that I would never, ever thru-hike again.After my first thru-hike, I immediately delved into the “real world” and got a “real job.” I really enjoyed my marketing and events position at the museum and I was working with great people, so it caught me off-guard when several weeks, then months, passed and all I could think about was the trail.I was a different person than I had been before the trail. I liked the woman who finished much better than the naïve 21-year-old who started the path. My values had changed, and I now appreciated simplicity, solitude, and silence. I missed the quality relationships that I enjoyed on the trail. It seemed that in the woods, I got to know people for who they were as opposed to what they did. I longed to be back in rhythm with nature: waking up at dawn to the serenade of songbirds and going to bed at dusk to an insect lullaby. Plus, as great as my job was, it still was a desk job, and I missed moving.It didn’t take long for me to decide that as soon as I could save up enough money and time off of work, I would return to the woods.Hiking PartnerMarriage was not necessarily part of my long-distance hiking plans, but when I met Brew, I also realized it was unavoidable. It sounds cliché, but he was literally the best man I had ever met. However, my desire to go into the woods has not always been easy for him. With time, Brew became more comfortable with my ventures but he never enjoyed being left at home.Three weeks before I left for a long-distance hike in Australia, Gary Michael Hilton abducted Meredith Emerson on Blood Mountain, Ga. Meredith and I were the same age, and it seemed as if we could have been the same person. Her courageous actions led authorities to capture the man who was responsible for the murder of Cheryl Hines in Florida, and who is accused of killing John and Irene Bryant in the nearby Pink Beds of North Carolina. Yet, despite Meredith’s bravery, her life was not spared, and it was a terrifying reminder that bad things can happen in the woods. For the first time in years, I wondered whether or not I should hike on my own.Meredith was a hero; she stopped a serial killer and saved lives—potentially my own. I wanted to honor her memory by living fully— and by hiking. I had already planned on hiking the Appalachian Trail again that summer, but now I wasn’t just hiking for me, I was hiking for Meredith, too.When Brew and I decided to chase the women’s record on the Appalachian Trail in 2008, the idea was born out of passion and practicality. I loved the trail, but I loved Brew more. Neither one of us wanted to be separated from the other for several months. Until this time I had always hiked on my own with a full backpack, but Brew was a teacher, and he agreed to donate his summer to help me hike the trail and honor Meredith.Our goal was to establish a women’s record on the trail.  Until this time, only men had recruited support teams in an attempt to travel down the path as quickly as possible. I wanted to demonstrate that women could set trail records, and I had a feeling that Meredith would approve.I hiked 11 to 13 hours every day, never taking a day off, with only brief stops to rest. At times, where the grade was gentle and the tread less technical, I even ran—or rather, shuffled—a little bit.Physically, I was working harder than I had in my entire life, yet in a way, the experience wasn’t as difficult as I had imagined. I could meet Brew at road crossings several times throughout the day. I only had to carry a daypack. I had milkshakes and French fries brought to me on the trail, and I could change into a fresh pair of socks every morning. I loved trail records!After completing the trail in 57 days, I felt tired and happy. But I walked down Springer Mountain knowing that I had not used all my energy reserves. In retrospect, I realized that I had put limitations on myself throughout the journey. For the most part, I was only willing to hike during daylight hours and I stopped at dusk, even when my body felt that it could keep going. And, I was even more disappointed when I realized that I had set limitations on myself based on the fact that I was a woman. I bought into the idea that men are faster and stronger than women and that a woman should consider herself fortunate to be within 10 days of the men’s record.At that time, I didn’t have any immediate plans to return to the Appalachian Trail, but as the seasons changed, I became convinced that a trail record really has little to do with strength and speed. Instead, the most important qualities of a record setter are efficiency, consistency, and knowledge of both the trail and oneself. Before a full year passed, I found myself wanting to try for an Appalachian Trail Record once again. During her record-setting hike, Pharr Davis averaged 50 miles a day without a single rest day.center_img Jennifer Pharr Davis hiked the 2,180-mile Appalachian Trail in 46 days, 11 hours, and 20 minutes. Jennifer Pharr Davis sets the overall Appalachian Trail speed recordlast_img read more

Honduran Armed Forces Provide Medical Care to 60,000 Civilians

first_imgBy Dialogo March 09, 2015 It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. In San Pedro Sula, the 105th Infantry Brigade, in cooperation with 300 volunteer health professionals, provided medical care to more than 12,000 people. The volunteers included general physicians, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, psychologists, pediatricians, and dentists. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. “The Armed Forces has always placed a high premium on its civic duties,” said Romeo Vásquez, a Military analyst. “They play an important role in the prevention of diseases by controlling vectors that can be deadly. The medical brigades are a way for the institution to be close to the population, mainly the most disadvantaged sectors of the population, where the majority of the members of the Armed Forces are from.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. In addition to Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, medical brigades were carried out in the western Department of Copán and the eastern Department of Olancho, as well as the Caribbean archipelago of the Bay Islands. As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. The Armed Forces and health care volunteers are bringing medical care to people who live in places where such services are not readily available. Bringing health care to the civilian population Bringing health care to the civilian population The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” Many civilians are grateful for the medical brigades. “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Comprehensive assistance “People from different communities approach us to request that we include them, that we take a medical brigade to their towns,” Col. Sánchez said. “And we take them seriously. We are considering their requests, as we are already planning next year’s brigades.” “Our aspiration is to carry out 125 medical brigades like this one in the entire country and service more than 400,000 people,” Minister Reyes said. “This year we want to exceed what was done before. We trust God and our Armed Forces that we will complete this mission.” This family atmosphere will accompany the medical brigades scheduled to take place in March in the city of Siguatepeque in the Comayagua Department, as well as in the Atlántida, Valle, and Lempira Departments. A brigade will also return to the Francisco Morazán Department. Medical personnel from Joint Task Force Bravo, one of two task forces under United States Southern Command, will partner with the Armed Forces in La Campa, Lempira. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. The last brigade in March is scheduled to occur in Parque Central, in the middle of the capital. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Helping the civilian population As of early March, the medical brigades had already provided health services to 60,000 people so far in 2015, Colonel José Antonio Sánchez, spokesman for Armed Forces of Honduras, told Diálogo. Military personnel and health care volunteers carried out eight medical brigades in different departments in January and February. Helping the civilian population Community pastors and priests often participate, as do lawyers, to provide spiritual and legal assistance as needed. Attendance was even larger at the medical brigade in the capital city, Tegucigalpa. There, medical professionals and Military personnel teamed up to provide health care to more than 13,000 people gathered at a soccer field in the densely populated neighborhood of La Laguna. Personnel from the Army, Navy, and Air Force participated in the event. The population has embraced the program wholeheartedly. In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. “To the best of our abilities, we want the civic-military actions to provide a more comprehensive care,” Col. Sánchez said. “We have added services as we have seen additional needs on the field.” Each medical brigade has become a family affair, with scaling walls set up for those who want to exercise and inflatable jumping castles on hand to entertain the children. Comprehensive assistance The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. The Honduran Armed Forces is prepared to surpass the number of people it helped with medical brigades in 2014, according to Gen. Díaz Zelaya. “All of us Soldiers are ready to surpass the outreach we did last year,” he told the Military newscast Proyecciones Militares. “We want to improve the quality of life of the people who have come to us and will come to us throughout the following months.” In some instances, the Armed Forces, through its team of engineers, repairs sectors of roads that have suffered damage in the localities where the brigades take place. The Armed Forces also undertake projects to repair other public infrastructure such as schools, churches, and community centers. The mission is to provide health care to residents who do not have easy access to medical services on a regular basis, according to Colonel Porfirio Moreno Zavala, commander of the 105th Infantry Brigade. “What they are doing is wonderful,” said Tegucigalpa senior citizen Amadeo Quiroz. “If we go to one of the clinics nearby, there is no medicine there.” Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. It is not unusual for the community to see Soldiers applying a fresh coat of paint on a facility or cleaning the streets days prior to the brigade. On the day of the event, activities start at 7:00 a.m. and end only when everyone in attendance has been serviced and everything has been cleaned up. The goal of the Armed Forces is to help provide health care to hundreds of thousands of people, according to Defense Minister Samuel Reyes, who attended the inaugural brigade in Tegucigalpa, along with General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Honduran Armed Forces recently provided medical services to tens of thousands of people throughout the country through a series of medical brigades. The Military provided the services as part of its medical outreach program. Each brigade has a preventive component. In every location, private institutions and community leaders are involved to provide educational speeches conducive to better health practices. The Armed Forces also assists the Department of Health in its vaccination campaigns focused both on people and pets. “It is very complicated for people who live in faraway places to obtain timely and proper medical attention,” Col. Sánchez said. “It is a large burden for families who can’t travel to the big medical centers in the cities. We believe in taking the care to where they are. We are aware that even people in the cities can’t always access care as well.” “We gave free medications to people who needed them,” the colonel said. “We obtained most of it through donations and financed another part with an institutional fund of $10,000 destined for that purpose.” last_img read more

Eade on: The sport of Kings in the venue of paupers

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Marriage bill views differ wildly

first_imgThePress 29 Jan 2013Biology, religion and love came to the fore when the controversial issue of same-sex marriage was debated in front of MPs in Christchurch. The city’s Air Force Museum yesterday hosted the parliamentary select committee considering public submissions on the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, which would legalise same-sex marriage. The committee’s MPs heard from about 20 supporters and opponents of the bill, with many in favour of same-sex marriage drawing on their experiences of discrimination. Otago University Students’ Association queer support officer Neill Ballantyne said his own experience as a bisexual man amplified the hypocrisy of the current law. “It seems absolutely ridiculous to me that if I fall in love and want to spend the rest of my life with a woman, I can [get married] but, if I fall in love and want to spend the rest of my life with a man, I only get the consolation prize of a civil union.” Sara Epperson reminisced about dressing up as a 4-year-old bride at Halloween, saying the gap between her childhood dreams and her recent civil union had to be bridged for the sake of gay New Zealanders.http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/8233110/Marriage-bill-views-differ-wildlylast_img read more

YMG brings joy to House of Hope residents in Delices

first_img Tweet 33 Views   no discussions Share Share A member of Youth On A Mission For God doing a pedicure for a resident of the House of Hope Young people involved in ministry have embarked on a mission of spreading love, joy and peace to others, especially those who are disabled or otherwise less fortunate.Youth on a Mission for God (YMG) has been described as “a group of young persons whose goal is to seek solutions to the difficulties that we face in our community” by Beverly Leblanc the public relations officer of that organization.YMG recently embarked on a number of outreach projects, engaging their members in positive activities such as beach clean ups, poster competition for a preschool and wall painting in the village of Loubiere.On March 31sst, 2012 the group visited the House of Hope in Delices which is a residential home for persons with disabilities where the members read stories, played with and gave pedicures to the residents.According to Mrs. Leblanc that visit to the House of Hope is their missionary 2nd trip, the first was to Shernel Prince of Wesley a teenager who died two weeks ago after undergoing treatment in Trinidad.“We want to develop in the heart of our young people a heart of a servant, we want them to be servants in the kingdom of God and so we brought them there [House of Hope] and it was really a blessing to see the way they combed their hair, they fed them, played with them, just the interaction. It was really nice to see these young children just interact with the persons with disability,” Leblanc said.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTg1m-0rhro[/youtube]She also explained that even the caregivers were able to relax as the young people attended to the residents.“We did pedicures for them and it was kind of difficult because some of them did not want to put their feet in the water but it was still a blessing. We gave them a hamper and some clothing items so they can use and if they want they can also share with other persons in the community”.Another initiative of YMG is a program called bridging the gap where they visit different districts and sing hymns with a view to getting “young people to appreciate the hymns”.Thus far, they have held one in the north, south and will be visiting the South-East district on April 27th, 2012 which includes churches in La Plaine, Good Hope, Grand Fond and Delices.“We invite the churches to come together and sing whatever songs they wish but it has to be hymns. It is open so they can sing on whatever beat/rhythm. We will also have a panel discussion and at that discussion we will have elders and we will interview them so that they can talk to us about how it used to be before as Christians and the struggles just to encourage the young people now to continue to serve God”.The group plans to visit the Infirmary and CHANCES as part of their outreach programs later down in the year.Dominica Vibes Newscenter_img Sharing is caring! LocalNews YMG brings joy to House of Hope residents in Delices by: – April 17, 2012 Sharelast_img read more

COVID-19: FG Approves Stadiums, NYSC Camps as isolation Centres

first_img London’s ExCeL Exhibition and Conference Centre is being repurposed to care for patients infected with COVID-19. In Brazil, top football clubs have turned over their stadiums to the country’s health authorities to use as field hospitals. The Hard Rock Stadium in Florida, United States was converted into a community testing centre amongst others. Back home, Lagos State Government has set up the Onikan Stadium (Mobolaji Johnson Stadium) to support efforts at halting the pandemic. “While our prayers are that Nigeria never gets to the level where these facilities will be put to this use, we must however all be prepared to support the system and ensure that the nation is not caught unawares,” the minister stated. Read Also:Sports Minister Decorates Gov Okowa with Award He assured Nigerians, saying: “We are in this together, and together we shall overcome. I call on the youth of Nigeria to be at the vanguard of dissemination of timely and accurate information via social media to Nigerians in their communities. We must ratchet up the awareness campaign for our people. “God bless all our doctors and medical staff at this critical time,” the Minister said. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… The Minister of Youth and Sports Development, Mr. Sunday Dare explained that the ministry is in touch with relevant authorities and stakeholders to make these facilities available in line with Mr. President’s approval to halting the spread of COVID-19.According to him: “Since the stadiums are huge complexes with many outdoor and indoor areas, it is now up to medical personnel and authorities to determine the appropriate areas of usage if and when necessary. “The stadiums can be used as testing centres and because of space they will allow for required distancing. The identification and fumigation of multiple buildings such as the multipurpose sports hall, gymnastics and other spaces located in the stadium will commence shortly. “The world over, stadiums are being used by nations as they race against the ravages of COVID -19. The Santiago Bernabéu (Real Madrid Stadium) will be turned into a storage and distribution centre for medical materials donated to the health authorities in Spain. As part of efforts to curb the spread of the covid-19 pandemic, the Federal Government has approved for the Ministry of Youth and Sports Development to make available the stadiums in Surulere, Lagos; Ibadan, Abuja, and Kaduna as well as the orientation camps of the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) nationwide as isolation centers. Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks15 Photos Of Amazingly Beautiful MutationsMysterious Astrological Discoveries That Left Scientists Baffled8 Little-Known Facts About Ancient Egypt That Will Puzzle YouWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Famous And Incredibly Unique Places In ThailandBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Themlast_img read more

US Senate panel OKs resolution calling for De Lima’s release

first_imgSecurity personnel escort Sen. Leila de Lima to a press conference. One of the fiercest critics of President Rodrigo Duterte, De Lima is accused of having abetted the illegal drug trade in the New Bilibid Prison when she was justice secretary from 2010 to 2015. GETTY IMAGES The US Senate foreign relations committee has approved US Senate Resolution 142, which also condemned the arrest and detention of human rights defenders and political leaders and harassment, arrest, unjust judicial proceedings against media and journalists, particularly Rappler and Maria Ressa. The US senators also called on US President Donald Trump to impose sanctions pursuant to Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act such as revocation of US visas and freezing of assets against Philippine officials and security forces allegedly responsible for extrajudicial killings and orchestrating the arrest and prolonged detention of De Lima. The Philippine government should also recognize the importance of human rights defenders and their work and allow them to operate freely without fear of reprisal and guarantee the right to the freedom of the press, and to drop all the charges against Ressa and Rappler. It further urged Trump to ensure that US security assistance provided to the Philippine National Police is fully consistent with the human rights conditions mandated in the Arms Export Control Act and Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. It further denounced the Philippine government for its alleged role in state-sanctioned extrajudicial killings by police and other armed individuals as part of its anti-drug campaign.center_img De Lima, in a press statement from her detention cell, welcomed this move.  MANILA – The United States Senate panelhas approved a resolution urging the Philippine government to drop charges againstSen. Leila de Lima and order her immediate release. “Sen. De Lima is a prisoner of conscience as she is detained solely on account of her political views and the legitimate exercise of her freedom of expression,” the resolution wrote. “I’ve always believed that standing strong for one’s convictions and fighting always for what is true and just, for human rights and humanity have many friends around the globe,” De Lima said./PNlast_img read more

Retiring Players and Numbers

first_imgJust recently the Indianapolis Colts reported that they will retired Peyton Manning’s No. 18.  This is a common practice when someone does a great job as a sports figure for a certain team.  No one in baseball is allowed to wear #42.  That belonged to Jackie Robinson.  Major League baseball has retired that number and  no baseball team can use it.  This was done to honor Robinson for his bravery in breaking a color line.As a funny sideline to this story, I like to tell people that my No. 15 basketball uniform was retired by Batesville High School.  Of course, this is not true.  However, for some reason, no player has worn #15 on a boys varsity basketball uniform for almost 50 years.  It has nothing to do with my basketball playing ability.  I have no idea why they don’t use 15 any more.last_img read more

PSG striker Karamoko completes Man Utd trials

first_img Loading… Promoted Content13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootThe Best Cars Of All Time8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWhat Is A Black Hole And Is It Dangerous For Us All?10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do10 Amazing Characters We Wish Were Official Disney Princesses Released PSG striker, Isaac Karamoko, has completed trials with Manchester United. The 18-year-old was allowed to come off contract with PSG this summer and had tests at Carrington last week. For the moment, reports Goal France, United have decided not to offer Karamoko a contract, though the situation could change.Advertisementcenter_img United are keen to sign a new striker for their U23 team with Anthony Elanga the only recognised attacker available due to a raft of injuries. read also:PSG thought about buying Messi- Leonardo Released Yeovil Town striker Devon Arnold has also been trialling with United and another young forward is expected to arrive for tests this week. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more